Cash payments for temporary visa holders  

Temporary visa holders that live in Tasmania will now be able to access cash payments if they have been affected by the coronavirus crisis.

As part of a $3 million COVID-19 support package, Tasmania will be providing cash payments to those that are suffering financial hardship as a result of the pandemic. One-off payments of $250 will be given to temporary visa holders that are suffering financial hardship, whilst one-off payments up to $1000 will be given to families.

Of the 26,000 temporary visa holders in Tasmania, many have been significantly impacted by business closures, particularly those working in the tourism and hospitality industry.

Premier Peter Gutwein believes all temporary visa holders have the right to be supported during the coronavirus pandemic.

“I want to say that I don’t agree with the very simple message that temporary visa holders should just go home,”

“It’s important we support these people who’ve been working in our community earning an income and this package will take the steps necessary to do that.”

– Premier Gutwein

The State Government is also pushing to freeze all residential rent rises until at least the 30th June, 2020.

Tasmania will also increase the amount of funding that is invested in non-government organisations in order to provide emergency relief for temporary visa holder.

On a national level, the Federal Government has extended superannuation access to temporary visa holders who have resided in Australia for more than twelve months.

COVID-19 Updates for Tasmania: 

As of the 30th of April 2020, Tasmania has recorded 221 cases of COVID-19, with more than half linked to the outbreak that occurred between the two Burnie Hospitals in Tasmania’s north-west. Since the outbreak, the number of new daily cases has dropped significantly.

The tighter restrictions that have been imposed on Tasmania’s north-west after a coronavirus outbreak, will be lifted by the 3rd of May 2020. Premier Gutwein states that the situation in the region is largely under control.

Since the outbreak three weeks ago, schools and non-essential businesses have been closed. On the 4th of May 2020, businesses will be able to operate and schools will be open to students that are unable to stay at home. Non-essential businesses such as big box retailers, clothing stores, hairdressers, tobacconists and the like, will be able to reopen.

Further Support for Temporary Visa Holders & International Students:

The Australian Capital Territory (ACT) Government also announced a $20 million ‘Jobs for Canberrans’ support package which will be providing secure, short-term employment opportunities for temporary visa holders and international students until June 2021.

On the 21st of April 2020, the South Australian Government also announced that they will be investing $13.8 million into a support package for international students, in the wake of the coronavirus crisis.

COVID-19 & Free Healthcare:  

During the COVID-19 pandemic, those that do not have access to Medicare but require testing, treatment or any other public health support services that are related to COVID-19 will have free medical access. Within the ACT public health system, this also includes free access to pathology, diagnostic, pharmaceutical and outpatient care.

Medicare ineligible patients may include those who are not an Australian permanent resident, are not entitled to hold a valid Medicare card, or temporary entrants, temporary visa holders, or those that are not from a country that has a Reciprocal Health Care Arrangement with Australia.

If you need assistance or advice with your visa application, Results Migration are the best in the field, with a team of experienced Immigration Lawyers and Brisbane Registered Migration Agents that are able to guide you through this complex area of law. Call Results Migration on 1800 808 717 or email us on info@resultsmigration.com.au and book your free consultation today! 

 

By |May 1st, 2020|General news|Comments Off on Cash payments for temporary visa holders  

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